Jan 10 • 26M

Blue Dots in a Red Sea (Ep. 11)

The Ballot Proposal. Yes, you can pass a law.

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Academy Award-winning filmmaker and political provocateur Michael Moore offers his subversive and humorous take on the issues of the day and talks to a wide range of people from comedians and politicians to the people who’ve tried to kill him. Plus various mischief with Mike’s friends, family and the neighbors who don’t work for the NSA.
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We are often told that we are led by a “government of the people, by the people, for the people.”

But being a liberal/left/progressive/Democrat in a red state, run by a red legislature intent on banning books, suppressing the vote of its Black and Brown citizens, and stripping women of their right to bodily autonomy, it can feel more like you’re living in a 16th century Christian state or last week in Alabama. And change seems at best improbable, but most often impossible.

Yet, 26 states — including a bunch of red states like Mississippi, Florida, Wyoming and more — offer a clear path for citizens to create change and pass laws themselves, through ballot initiatives. That’s how a red state like Nebraska raised its minimum wage by nearly 70%, how a red state like Montana legalized marijuana, and how Michigan was able to break free from its gerrymandered red chains and turn blue.

In episode 11 of my mini-podcast series “Blue Dots in a Red Sea” I encourage those that live in one of those 26 states (or the District of Columbia), and have the ability to create citizen-led ballot proposals to use this incredible tool in this 2024 election cycle.

End gerrymandering!

Codify the right to abortion!

Raise the minimum wage!

Legalize marijuana!

Expand voting rights!

Create paid family leave!

…whatever your state needs most to better the lives of your neighbors, and help give a reason for those with progressive values, who have given up on voting, to come out and cast a ballot in 2024.

And for those that live in states that don’t allow for citizen-led ballot initiatives — especially in blue states like New York — implore your state legislature to change that!

Please listen and share.


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Watch the documentary “Slay the Dragon” about citizen-led efforts to end gerrymandering — including the historic victory of Michigan’s Proposition 2 in 2018.

For library card holders, Slay the Dragon is available for free on Kanopy — the online streaming platform for academic and public libraries.

It is also available on Hulu, and for rental on Amazon Prime.


ICYMI:

Blue Dots in a Red Sea (A New Blue Tsunami Series)

Episode 1: Our Next “Impossible” Blue Tsunami Task: How to Win When You’re Blue in a Red State

Episode 2: You Are Not Alone. There Is Blue All Around.

Episode 3: They Are More Blue Than You — Or They — Know

Episode 4: It’s Time to Form Your Own Local “Democratic Party!”

Episode 5: “Need Help? Call the Democrats!”

Episode 6: Our Civic Duty — WE Must Attend!

Episode 7: Michael Moore’s 2023 New Year’s Resolutions: “More Democracy!”

Episode 8: Start Your Own Local Online Paper

Episode 9: Red States Need a Blue Sister City or Two

Episode 10: Recruit and Run a Beloved Blue Winner


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Write to Mike: mike@michaelmoore.com


Music in this episode:

My Blue Heaven” — Norah Jones


Episode underwriter:

1) Anchor.fm can help you start your own podcast. Go to anchor.fm to learn more.


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